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It is time to embark on a global odyssey to discover the largest and least explored habitat on earth. New ocean science and technology has allowed us to go further into the unknown than we ever thought possible.

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About the film

It is time to embark on a global odyssey to discover the largest and least explored habitat on earth. New ocean science and technology has allowed us to go further into the unknown than we ever thought possible.

From the coastal shallows to deeper, more mysterious worlds, we reveal the untold stories of the oceans' most astonishing creatures.

Dolphins leap for joy through the waves, as we begin our journey into the blue. Our first stop is the coral reefs, where we meet fascinating characters like the ingenious tusk fish that uses a tool to open its food. In the great forests of the sea, we find a cunning octopus who shields herself in an armoury of shells to hide from predators.

As we journey in 3D through our oceans, we share these extraordinary discoveries and uncover a spectacular world of life beneath the waves.

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Facts

The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest living structure -- It is made up of around 3000 coral reefs and is larger in area than the entire United Kingdom.

Coral reefs cover just 0.1% of the ocean’s surface area, yet they are home to 25% of all known marine species.

Dolphins have lungs and breathe air like we do. They can hold their breath for more than 15 minutes.

About half of the planet’s total atmospheric oxygen is produced by ocean phytoplankton.

Kelp is one of the fastest growing organisms in the world - giant kelp can grow up to half a meter a day!

The common octopus is capable of behaviours so smart and sophisticated, that scientists compare their activities to chimpanzees.

It is thought that sea otters can spend their entire lives without leaving the water.

The deepest part of the ocean is almost 11 kilometres down!

More people have been to the moon than have been to the deepest parts of our oceans.

Humpback whales can reach 18 metres in length and weigh up to 40 tonnes – that’s more than four large elephants!

The ingenious tusk fish have figured out how to break open hard-shelled clams by cracking them against coral outcrops.

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